J.P Ribet’s range

Packaging:

A segmented tray of 1 kg (net)
Marrons glacés NAPLES WITHOUT WRAPPING – (3 x 1 kg)
Best Before Date 2 months
Marrons glacés Turin WITHOUT WRAPPING – (3 x 1 kg)
Best Before Date 2 months

The professional range

Packaging

Whole NAPLES marrons:
Golden paper wrapped: Bulk – Best Before Date 2 months. Net weight: 2 x 1.000 Kg
Without Wrapping: Bulk – Best Before Date 2 months. Net weight: 2 x 1.000 Kg
Whole Turin marrons:
Golden paper wrapped: Bulk – Best Before Date 2 months. Net weight: 2 x 1.000 Kg
Without Wrapping: Bulk – Best Before Date 2 months. Net weight: 2 x 1.000 Kg

The tendance range

Packaging

Box of 12 Turin wrapped in golden paper:
Best Before Date 4 months – Protective seal. Net weight: 6x250g
Box of 18 Turin wrapped in golden paper “Violine”:
Best Before Date 4 months . Net weight: 6x250g’s

The production process

All cooking processes are managed by a programmable controller and are subject to strict monitoring in terms of timing and temperature. Every minute counts in order to obtain the ideal softness. Overcooked, the chestnut flesh will be mushy. Under-cooked, it will be hard and dry.

It consists of gradually increasing the sugar concentration in the fruits by immersing them in sugar syrups. A marron glacé needs a minimum of 4 days to be crystallised. A phase, called a stabilisation phase, which lasts several days finalises the crystallisation process. Therefore, we need at least ten days to develop a marron glacé with a delicate texture and a subtlety that preserves the taste of the chestnut.

Then comes the “French” style glazing stage, consisting of covering the fruit with a very fine layer of icing sugar. The final appearance must be shinny but with a thinness worthy of the typical high-class marron glacé. At this stage, a strict quality control eliminates any fruits with undesirable shapes as well as the marrons with too light or too dark a colour.

After having been dried in a temperature controlled location, the marrons are then conditioned; either as they are or after having been wrapped individually. An internal physical-chemical analysis laboratory, as well as a microbiology laboratory, allow continual monitoring of the various production stages. Of course, the entire production process is subject to an integral tracing process right from receiving the raw ingredients until the finished product.